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Posts Tagged ‘Blessed Sacrament’

It is a bedrock Catholic truth, taught by the Church since the time of the Apostles, that Our Lord Jesus Christ is truly present in the Most Holy Eucharist: Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity.

The Council of Trent defined dogmatically that Our Lord Jesus Christ is present in every part of the Blessed Sacrament. The Council taught infallibly:

“If anyone denieth that, in the venerable Sacrament of the Eucharist, the whole Christ is contained under each species, and under every part of each species, when separated; let him be anathema.”
This means that Our Lord is present even in the smallest particle of the Host, and in the smallest particle that may fall to the ground. Thus the reverence that we owe to the Blessed Sacrament demands that we take every precaution that no particle of the Host — not even the smallest — is left open for desecration in any way.

First of all, Saint Thomas Aquinas taught that “out of reverence for this Sacrament, nothing touches it but what is consecrated.” Thus, he said the sacred vessels of the altar are consecrated for this holy purpose, but also, the priest’s hands are consecrated for touching this Sacrament. And St. Thomas said that it is therefore not lawful for anyone else to touch it, except to save it from desecration. (Summa, III, Q. 82. Art. 3)

This reverence for the Blessed Sacrament, and even for the smallest particles, was incorporated into the traditional Mass — the Old Latin Mass — which contained strict rubrics on this point:

1) From the moment the priest pronounces the words of the Consecration over the Sacred Host, the priest keeps his forefinger and thumb together on each hand. Whether he elevates the chalice, or turns the pages of the missal, or opens the tabernacle, his thumb and his forefinger on each hand are closed. The thumb and forefinger touch nothing but the Sacred Host;

2) During Holy Communion, the altar boy holds the paten under the chin of those receiving Communion, so that the slightest particle does not fall to the ground. This paten is cleaned into the chalice afterwards;

3) After Holy Communion is distributed, the priest scrapes the corporal (the small linen cloth on the altar) with the paten, and cleans it into the chalice so that if the slightest particle is left, it is collected and consumed by the priest;

4) Then, the priest washes his thumb and forefinger over the chalice with water and wine, and this water and wine is reverently consumed to insure that the smallest particle of the Sacred Host is not susceptible to desecration.

Communion in the hand and so-called Eucharist lay-ministers make a mockery of the Divine Truth that Our Lord is truly present in every particle of the Eucharist, and make a mockery of the holy rubrics used by the Church for centuries as a safeguard against desecration.

Because what happens with Communion in the hand?

The Host is placed in the hand, which is not consecrated. The communicant picks It up with his own fingers, which are not consecrated. The sacred particles fall to the ground, are stepped upon and desecrated.

Likewise with so-called Eucharistic lay-ministers, their hands are not consecrated; they should not be touching the Sacred Host. The sacred particles of the Host fall to the ground, are stepped upon and desecrated. The fingers of “lay-Eucharistic ministers” are not washed, so any particle remaining will also be desecrated.

No authority in the Church, not even the highest, can dispense a Catholic from the duty of preserving the necessary reverence owed to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament. Any Church leader who does so labors under the “diabolic disorientation of the upper hierarchy” warned against by Sister Lucy of Fatima, and is derelict in his duty.

Only forty-five years ago, Communion in the hand was unthinkable in Catholic churches. It was recognized for the sacrilege that it is. Only forty-five years ago, Eucharistic lay-ministers were unthinkable in Catholic churches. It was recognized for the sacrilege that it is.

But now, these abuses are permitted and promoted by a liberal hierarchy who — in this area and in many other areas — suddenly approve what the Church always rightly condemned. This “suddenly blessing what the Church always condemned” is the hallmark of the Vatican II reforms.

The truth, however, is that God does not change, and man’s duty of reverence toward the Blessed Sacrament does not change, even if we have many leaders who in their destructive liberalization of the Catholic Church, seem to care little or nothing for the true reverence we owe to Our Lord in the Holy Eucharist.

Thus, anyone who receives Communion in the hand, or who receives Communion from a Eucharistic lay-minister, or who is a Eucharistic lay-minister himself or herself — in the objective order — is committing a sacrilege. It is a misuse of a holy thing. It is a mockery of what the Church has taught and practiced. It is a desecration of the greatest gift that God has given us: the Real Presence of Our Lord Jesus Christ in the Most Holy Eucharist.

The Need for Reparation

In 1916, a year before Our Lady’s visitations at Fatima, the “Angel of the Eucharist” appeared with Chalice and Host to the children. He administered the Sacred species to the three children saying, “Eat and drink the Body and Blood of Our Lord, horribly outraged by ungrateful men. Make reparation for their crimes and console your God.” The Angel left the chalice and the Host suspended in the air, and prostrated himself before It. The children imitated him. The Angel then prayed repeatedly this act of reparation:

“Most Holy Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Ghost, I offer Thee the Most Precious Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Jesus Christ, present in all the tabernacles of the world, in reparation for the outrages, sacrileges and indifference by which He Himself is offended. And by the infinite merits of His most Sacred Heart and of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, I beg of Thee the conversion of poor sinners.”

Let us commit to memory this prayer and say it throughout the day as often as possible. The “outrages, sacrileges and indifference” toward the Blessed Sacrament. Sacrilege is so commonplace that it is no longer recognized as sacrilege. The need for reparation is colossal.

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Pope Benedict XVI is happy to report a “springtime of Eucharist devotion in the Church today,” he told his weekly public audience on November 16.

The Pope said that he has seen a revival of interest in Eucharistic adoration, especially among young people. It is a “wonderful development,” he said that more people “stop in silence before the tabernacle to spend time with Him.”

The Pope made these remarks as he discussed the influence of St. Juliana of Liege, an Augustinian nun who experienced a mystical vision that prompted her to advocate the establishment of the liturgical feast of Corpus Christi to inspire greater devotion to the Eucharist. Pope Urban IV proclaimed that feast in 1264, enlisting St. Thomas Aquinas to write the beautiful liturgical texts for the feast.

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Most Holy Trinity, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, I adore You.

You have brought me into existence, you support me throughout my life and you invite me to share in your life forever. How good you are to me! Protect me from moral and spiritual harm. Give me your spirit to inspire, guide and transform me. Use me for your Glory and for the use of others and never let me be separated from you, my God and my all! Amen

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True Presence in the Most Blessed Sacrament. Jesus is with us!

I thought I’d write a short post on this wonderful gift of our Faith that is the Holy Eucharist and the Real Presence of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. I have recently started to attend my local Adoration Chapel, and I am truly amazed with  how this has helped me to get closer to God,  to want to  honour Our Lord Jesus Christ and spend time with Him.

I am still not a regular adorer – I try to go to  adoration as a visitor every day, for at least for 30 minutes, if I cannot do a full hour – but I am confident that slowly, as I grow closer to Him and more fervent in my belief in the Real presence, Jesus will start pouring His blessings upon me and my loved ones.

I started out just occasionally going into the Chapel,  and I  confess that I didn’t know very well what to do, or even what to pray while I was there. Gently, I begun to feel more confortable in the presence of our Eucharistic Lord and praying was just a natural consequence of my visits.  Gradualy, I decided to increase the lenght of  my adoration, and to visit more0 often. This is probably why I began to feel that I needed to  ‘structure’ my visits to Jesus a bit more, so that I could make the most of my time with Him.

Since then, I generally start out by kneeling before the Blessed Sacrament and just gazing at Him for a moment. Then, I say a little spontaneous prayer and thank Him for allowing me to be in His Presence.  After saying a thanksgiving prayer, I prostrate before the Blessed Sacrament as I say to Jesus that I love Him and that I am happy to be there. After that, I may just sit down for a moment and pray.

If I have a special request for Our Lord, I sometimes recite the  rosary or  meditate on a particular passage of the Bible or spirtitual book.  Often I find myself asking for forgiveness for my sins, for guidance on my personal life and help with my spiritual growth. Sometimes I may also pray for the reparation of all the sins committed against Our Lord and for his protection for Catholic Church. I find it very beneficial reading spiritual texts, and devotions by various Saints. This structure seem to be working fine for me for the time being, but it might change as I grow more mature or committed to the adoration of the Blessed Sacrament.

Anyhow, I feel really blessed that we have a Perpetual Adoration Chapel where I live and I encourage any-one who is considering becoming an adorer but haven’t been blessed with a local Chapel, that they get organized with other people in their Parish, and that they talk to their local priest and suggest to them starting of an Adoration Hour in their local Church, at least on a weekly basis… If that is not possible, I encourage all Catholics to vist Jesus in the Tabernacle in the Church, and just spend some quiet time with Him, meditating on this wonderful mystery of the True Presence!

Here I post a link to a Catholic website with some information and testimonials of various recent miracles related to the Most Blessed Sacrament

 

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